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  • Star Trails

    Not really embarrassing but is there a tut somewhere on how to do star trails??? Been seeing a lot of late and LOVE them.

  • #2
    http://lmgtfy.com/?q=startrails+tutorial
    -Tim.

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    • #3
      Re: Star Trails

      Haha, love that site.

      Check out Barry’s posts, he may have written some.

      Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk 2
      Adrian

      Gear List

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      • #4
        check Rod's ( Remorhaz) posts he did some amazing shots of star trails and he gives all the tech details as well
        cheers
        tim
        flickr

        on the web, www.timmography.com

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        • #5
          I wouldn't mind doing star trails myself (ps: came to this thread from that other thread about new members) lol.

          [email protected] the link. I always google .. google is my friend .. google tells me my cat has cat flu when he doesn't .. after vet check he has gingivitis ..(infection of the gums of his mouth). Lesson never trust Dr Google.
          Anna
          https://www.flickr.com/photos/ladymilli/
          My stuff - 7D |100mm macro|Tamron 17-50mm|50mm 1.8|Sigma 50mm 1.4| stuff for macro

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          • #6
            You also need to watch the weather and moon chart. You generally need no moon, no cloud and be away from city lights

            http://www.weatherzone.com.au/qld/darling-downs/toowoomba
            Scroll down for moon times.
            Cheers for now, IanB.
            Photos by Ian Browne on Facebook

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            • #7
              From where you are, pointing south from your backyard will work, highlight a gnarly old dead tree or windmill or cattle yards etc for foreground interest and go for it, it is fun. You will get some light pollution from T'ba, particularly if going for longer exposures rather than stacking lots of 30 second exposures. The further west the better - eg from experience, even "fly specks" like Millmerran and Pittsworth provide light pollution at Cecil Plains.
              Last edited by ross and cher; 19-09-2012, 03:25 PM.

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              • #8
                Try out http://lmgtfy.com/?q=comedian+jobs

                That is great. Ok, next questions (and yes I could probably google it but I am sure there will be different thoughts on this) what equipment is required including the best lens?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Cat View Post
                  Try out http://lmgtfy.com/?q=comedian+jobs

                  That is great. Ok, next questions (and yes I could probably google it but I am sure there will be different thoughts on this) what equipment is required including the best lens?
                  makes little difference imo. in the wide open spaces a UWA, but a longer lens could also be used. Just experiment; that's the fun of photography. I can see a photo with your horses in it btw
                  Cheers for now, IanB.
                  Photos by Ian Browne on Facebook

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                  • #10
                    ^^ what he said - if you don't have too many hills blocking your view south UWA, but a zoom into the blades of a windmill for example could be quite effective

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                    • #11
                      makes little difference imo. in the wide open spaces a UWA, but a longer lens could also be used. Just experiment; that's the fun of photography. I can see a photo with your horses in it btw
                      Cool. Ok, I will have to get my act together and try this out. Don't expect me to show off my "skills" until I have at least one half decent shot.

                      ^^ what he said - if you don't have too many hills blocking your view south UWA, but a zoom into the blades of a windmill for example could be quite effective
                      I will see how I go with finding the right spot as what would look good in a photo has so many trees included as I am in a gully but my deck has a good view so I will try and pick something up from there.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Cat View Post
                        Cool. Ok, I will have to get my act together and try this out. Don't expect me to show off my "skills" until I have at least one half decent shot.



                        I will see how I go with finding the right spot as what would look good in a photo has so many trees included as I am in a gully but my deck has a good view so I will try and pick something up from there.
                        forget the right spot just now: back yard...fully charged battery....camera on a tripod.... point it at the southern cross [maybe a bit low in the sky atm] and just fiddle around....make a few notes. That will get you started. The many waste time finding the "perfect" spot so to speak. use what you have where you have to start with

                        The actually "south pole" is at about 2.5 times the length of the southern cross, or draw a line along the cross and another line from the centre of the pointers at 90 decrees and where those two lines meet is one of the "south poles". The stars rotate around that point.
                        Cheers for now, IanB.
                        Photos by Ian Browne on Facebook

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                        • #13
                          This is another one of those subjects that seems difficult - until you make the effort to read up about it a bit - try it - and find it's pretty easy to get a shot that you are happy with after a few experiments. (Noise reduction 'off' or you'll be waiting for another 20-30 mins before you can try again if you use the long exposure method). As mentioned above, light pollution is the problem with long exposures - you'd be suprised at how even the smallest amount of ambient light can look after 20 mins

                          Stacking can come later as you get more experience

                          Have fun
                          Alan

                          Still trying to make the ordinary look extraordinary

                          D7000 | D90 | Coolpix S31 | iPhone 6s | Mac

                          Flickr

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                          • #14
                            Rodney taught me everything I know.....

                            I bought an intervalometer to take the pics ....

                            I have used both the 24-70mm f2.8 & 17-40 f4 and didn't see much difference in brightness of the stars.
                            I did get some vertical distortion with the wide angle lens though - just a titch.
                            Set up the camera on the tripod pointing at the celestial south pole ( you can download an app that shows you where it is in real time - I use sky safari)
                            From memory I had the iso on 800, f2.8 and bulb, jpeg (my computer wouldnt cope with raw)
                            The intervalometer was set to take an image every second for about three hours.
                            I downloaded an action from star circle academy and ran it in photoshop. They have step but step instructions on how to do it so you should be laughing)

                            Once stacked I adjusted the levels to make the stars pop and that's pretty much it.

                            All credit goes to Rodney ......
                            Life is short, smile while you still have teeth .....
                            Art-ography

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