Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Speaking of Kookaburras

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Speaking of Kookaburras

    They are considered introduced species in Tassie too, Not sure how that works when birds have the ability to fly where ever they choose to. Anyway they sure can be savage on nestlings of smaller species.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	28b.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	410.5 KB
ID:	31544

    Click image for larger version

Name:	29b.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	708.0 KB
ID:	31545

    Click image for larger version

Name:	30b.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	146.2 KB
ID:	31546

    Shots taken locally a few years back.
    It's the little things!

    Cheers, Greg C.

  • #2
    Beautifully captured shots. A superb sequence. Poor little baby bird though. No wonder the magpies here will sometime gang up on a kookaburra and chase it off.

    I didn't know that they had been 'introduced' to Tassie too. {perhaps Bass Strait and the Nullarbor were a bit to much to cross unaided?) Whatever the story they certainly aren't going back now, even if we bought them all plane tickets. And they've been in WA over 100 years, so the bird has well and truly flown, so to speak.

    We used to get what appeared to be a young kookaburra, and quite a dopey looking character at that, who would come and sit on the verandah rail and stare imploringly at us. I think it had probably been getting fed somewhere in the district - but not by us.

    It eventually gave up trying to scam us and stopped hanging around, but not before I had an eye to eye chat with it...

    Cheers Chris

    Name:  Kooka01a.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  183.9 KB

    Last edited by ChrisC333; 18-12-2017, 10:57 PM.

    Comment


    • Isac
      Isac commented
      Editing a comment
      Great image Chris. Lovely catchlight showing the sky and trees.

  • #3
    That's close!

    What wonderful brown eyes it has. Almost a human quality.
    It's the little things!

    Cheers, Greg C.

    Comment


    • #4
      Great captures Greg, both you and the Kooka! Timing is great.
      IShootACanon

      Web: isacimages.com.au
      "Don't touch". Must be the scariest thing to read in braille!

      My Gear
      Proudly supporting Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre

      Comment


      • #5
        Apologies for adding more pictures to your thread Greg, but these were taken a few minutes ago and were directly inspired by your shots above, and also your advice about "being there". So these are dedicated to you and your kookaburra, from the other side of the continent!


        I was outside changing a tyre on my wife's car when I heard a kookaburra calling in a tree nearby. I thought, well better have a look - you never know... be there and all that...

        When I looked up I thought it had something in its beak, and was making the "food" noise. It looked a bit like a lizard, so I shot inside and grabbed the camera. It was still there when I got back. I didn't want to risk losing the chance so I just grabbed a handful of pictures. It was still set on F8, so I can legitimately say I followed the "F8 and be there" dictum.

        I couldn't believe my luck when I zoomed in for a look on the back of the camera. I've never got a picture of a kookaburra with a catch before, so it was a real thrill. Not in the class of the baby bird shots above, but nevertheless I was very pleased to get them.

        When I go through them I might find some better ones, but this was the first one I had a go at.

        01 A huge crop for shot 03
        Name:  KookaMouse 01a.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  120.9 KB


        02 A bit closer
        Name:  KookaMouse 02a.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  171.3 KB

        03 And then closer still. Alas poor Mickey...
        Name:  KookaMouse 03.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  168.1 KB

        Comment


        • #6
          Great detail, and excellent quality considering the crop. No worries adding to the interest in any of my posts. Training kookaburras to only catch mice seems like a great idea. By the way, with wildlife, particularly birds, I prefer to set shutter speed and let the camera do what it wants with aperature and ISO. You seem to have the right mix with this one though.
          It's the little things!

          Cheers, Greg C.

          Comment


          • #7
            Originally posted by seaslug View Post
            Great detail, and excellent quality considering the crop. No worries adding to the interest in any of my posts. Training kookaburras to only catch mice seems like a great idea. By the way, with wildlife, particularly birds, I prefer to set shutter speed and let the camera do what it wants with aperature and ISO. You seem to have the right mix with this one though.
            Would you be willing to share what settings you use please?

            I have two custom settings in place:

            One that's based around 1/1250th sec, AI servo and High burst rate. This is for birds in flight...in theory.... I still haven't worked out what the best focus system to use is though. There's a big range of possibilities. I also sometimes back the speed off a bit to get better ISO.

            The second is based around F8, 1/320th, single shot and low speed continuous. The idea is to use that for occasions when the birds are relatively still. Because of the hand held nature and the zoom lens, the shutter is still set reasonably fast. And birds are often around in the earlier part fo the day when the light isn't great so I often end up with a higher ISO that I'd like, but new cameras do a better job there than the old ones did.

            I also have the TV (shutter) setting left somewhere in between the two. Generally I'll wander round with the camera in the fast shutter custom setting, as you don't get time to change settings when the action suddenly starts. But if it's quiet then it's only one click across to take a portrait shot and then click back.

            But it's all still a bit experimental and I know that I have a lot to learn about it all. Fortunately, my major hobby is "finding stuff out" so I enjoy the journey.


            Cheers,

            Chris

            Comment


            • #8
              Originally posted by ChrisC333 View Post

              Would you be willing to share what settings you use please?

              I have two custom settings in place:

              One that's based around 1/1250th sec, AI servo and High burst rate. This is for birds in flight...in theory.... I still haven't worked out what the best focus system to use is though. There's a big range of possibilities. I also sometimes back the speed off a bit to get better ISO.

              The second is based around F8, 1/320th, single shot and low speed continuous. The idea is to use that for occasions when the birds are relatively still. Because of the hand held nature and the zoom lens, the shutter is still set reasonably fast. And birds are often around in the earlier part fo the day when the light isn't great so I often end up with a higher ISO that I'd like, but new cameras do a better job there than the old ones did.

              I also have the TV (shutter) setting left somewhere in between the two. Generally I'll wander round with the camera in the fast shutter custom setting, as you don't get time to change settings when the action suddenly starts. But if it's quiet then it's only one click across to take a portrait shot and then click back.

              But it's all still a bit experimental and I know that I have a lot to learn about it all. Fortunately, my major hobby is "finding stuff out" so I enjoy the journey.


              Cheers,

              Chris
              Hi Chris I really don't have any programmed settings as it all depends on the light of the day and what lens I have on. Typically I would set shutter to somewhere between 1/1000 and 1/1600 with birds in flight and small fast moving birds. Larger stationary or slow moving birds could be around 1/350 for my 210 mm lens or 1/500 for my 150-500 lens. (I almost always hand hold and don't set up shots. I take them as I find them).

              My equipment is a long way from high end and have been using Sony camera bodies with Sigma lenses for most of my bird-life shots. APS/C sensors @ 24 Mp.

              I'm not too concerned about a bit of noise on the image as I can process it out if I want to make a display print from them.

              Here's a couple of samples taken with a Sony A57 18 Mp fitted with Sigma 150-500.

              Diving Lapwing plover: 1/1600 F22 ISO 3200 160 mm.

              Click image for larger version

Name:	High level.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	113.5 KB
ID:	31559

              Silver eye: 1/1000, F9, ISO 1600 500 mm.

              Click image for larger version

Name:	Silver 3.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	112.0 KB
ID:	31560
              It's the little things!

              Cheers, Greg C.

              Comment


              • ChrisC333
                ChrisC333 commented
                Editing a comment
                Thanks Greg. It sounds like I'm in the right ballpark. 150-500mm sounds like a very useful lens for reaching out to birds. Good to hear that you find it acceptable to head up the ISO range a bit too. Very nice shots. I especially like the lapwing plover as it makes it look like you secretly have the power of flight as well, and might just have taken it with your helmet cam as you flew alongside. ...

            • #9
              Originally posted by ChrisC333 View Post



              But it's all still a bit experimental and I know that I have a lot to learn about it all. Fortunately, my major hobby is "finding stuff out" so I enjoy the journey.


              Cheers,

              Chris
              You might enjoy this one too. Certainly a lot of technical issues with the shot but I think it works, I like it and it shows just how fast these birds are in a dive.
              Shutter 1/1000. ISO 1600

              Click image for larger version

Name:	Close 1.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	88.5 KB
ID:	29448
              It's the little things!

              Cheers, Greg C.

              Comment


              • #10
                Love it!

                Great feeling of speed and just enough focus in the right spot to give the eye something to head towards. The judges I listened to at my brief sojourn at a camera club all seemed to be obsessed with sharpness and didn't seemed to get that blur is a good tool to indicate speed. in a range of sports and wildlife shots. I got told once that if I'd only used faster shutter speed I could have got rid of the motion blur right on the wingtips....! Yeah, right....

                I still keep one picture that is 100% blurred because I can tell people who ask how I got the shot that I was actually flying right behind the bird and the effort of flapping my arms was wobbling the camera on my helmet.....

                Catching up fast...
                Name:  MagChase01.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  40.2 KB

                Comment


                • seaslug
                  seaslug commented
                  Editing a comment
                  No doubt they believed that.
              Working...
              X