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  • Isac
    commented on 's reply
    maybe 2,040 in this one Hans. It's all subjective. Thanks for your input - always appreciated.

  • HansE
    commented on 's reply
    40 shades of grey lol

  • Isac
    replied
    We could go on ...
    This one using the Calculations method. A little brighter but more detail.
    Click image for larger version

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  • Isac
    commented on 's reply
    I like that Hans. The crop has worked well.

  • HansE
    replied
    I didn't think the plant as the point of interest as it was mainly in shadow The original just looked a bit grey. How else would you increase contrast if you were happy with the whites?
    This pushed a bit further of my copy now copied from a previous screen copy. Did not attempt to even sharpen.



    Click image for larger version

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  • Isac
    commented on 's reply
    You can be blunt with me Hans, no problem.
    I did have a look but it added dark shadows to the plant. Maybe add the "contrast" selectively with a mask?
    Last edited by Isac; 11-11-2021, 06:13 PM.

  • HansE
    commented on 's reply
    I didn't want to be that obviously blunt but you seem to have got there Did you have a look?

  • Isac
    commented on 's reply
    Hi Hans. Are you saying the image was flat and needed more contrast?

  • Isac
    commented on 's reply
    Perfectly explained for an old timer Phil Most of the things I got up to in a dark room had nothing to do with photography. I do fully understand the curves adjustments and its use so I now understand what the different paper grades did for working with contrast. Thank you very much sir!

  • Ozzie_Traveller
    replied

    Isac commented
    Yesterday, 06:43 PM

    I'm not understanding what "grade harder paper" is Hans or what you were trying to do with your edit - did you make it darker?



    Oh mate ..... the things "us ol' buggers" got up to in the dark(room) past that you miss out upon today

    From the densitometric curve of the negative ... ie: the slope from lower left to top right, one determines the contrast range of the negative's image and balances that with a Contrast Grade of paper. Grades ranged from 1 to 5, with most people using 2 or 3 as their base and moving up or down as needed to match tonal ranges

    A 'flat' negative has a contrast-curve at about 30 degrees of slope ... a 'normal' neg about 45 degrees and a 'hard' neg has about a 60degree slope. You will recognise the descriptions as matching "Curves" in PS

    When one had a 'normal' neg but wished to increase its contrast a bit, one chose a Grade higher than the usual one ... My usual was Grade-3 and so I went for a Grade-4 for more contrast in the final print ~~ this was used regularly when the viewing distance was more than usual so that the image stood out more clearly for the viewer - often behind a rope barrier at the exhibition or whatever I was involved with

    Phil

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  • HansE
    commented on 's reply
    You will seee it if you look at the images together. In the far distant past we used to print our images on paper. Paper came in different grades and if your picture looked a little flat you would increase the hardnes of the paper which would give the image greater more contrast. That's what I did here I did put them next to ech other and it shows.

  • Isac
    commented on 's reply
    I'm not understanding what "grade harder paper" is Hans or what you were trying to do with your edit - did you make it darker?

  • HansE
    replied
    I thought it woul like to be on a grade harder paper. Played with it but don' know if I managed much.

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  • Isac
    commented on 's reply
    Thank you Phil. I enjoy a BW conversion now and then. Some I've seen just use desaturation of the colours but there's a lot more involved in getting a good result.

  • Ozzie_Traveller
    replied
    G'day mate

    Always 'different' to see mono images for brightly coloured originals!
    You have done well with the conversions, with no blown-out whites. Well done

    Phil

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